Lord Clive Class Monitor (1915)

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Armament

The ships were armed as follows.[1]

As built:

Sir Thomas Picton:

  • two B.L. 12-in
  • two 12-pdr 12 cwt Q.F. guns[Inference]

Sir John Moore and Prince Rupert:

  • two B.L. 12-in
  • two 12-pdr 12 cwt Q.F. guns

Prince Eugene and General Craufurd:

  • two B.L. 12-in
  • two 3-pdr Vickers H.A. or two 3-in H.A. Mark II

Earl of Peterborough, Lord Clive and General Wolfe:

  • two B.L. 12-in
  • two 2-pdr pom-poms

In November 1918:

Sir Thomas Picton:

  • two B.L. 12-in
  • two 12-pdr 12 cwt Q.F. guns[Inference]
  • one 6-in Mark XII

Sir John Moore and Prince Rupert:

  • two B.L. 12-in
  • two 12-pdr 12 cwt Q.F. guns
  • two 6-in Mark VII

Prince Eugene:

  • two B.L. 12-in
  • two 3-pdr Vickers H.A. or two 3-in H.A. Mark II
  • two 6-in Mark VII

Earl of Peterborough (unchanged):

  • two B.L. 12-in
  • two 2-pdr pom-poms

Lord Clive:

  • one B.L. 18-in
  • two B.L. 12-in
  • two 6-in Mark VII
  • two 2-pdr pom-poms
  • two 3-in H.A.

General Wolfe:

  • one B.L. 18-in
  • two B.L. 12-in
  • four 4-in Mark IX
  • two 2-pdr pom-poms
  • two 3-in H.A.

18-inch Monitors

The delivery and installation of 18-in guns suffered from a frustrating series of delays. When the guns were first to be tried in Silloth on May 17th, the rammer motor was found too weak to seat the projectile. Nine days later, a more powerful motor made firing trials possible.

General Wolfe conducted the shipborne trials of the 18-in gun off the Isle of Wight on August 7th, 1918. Though the specification was a mere one round per six minutes, the gun in General Wolfe could fire one round every four minutes, though it was noted to create a great deal of work in the shell room. Lessons taken from this resulted in alterations to Lord Clive.[2]

Rate of fire improved with wartime practice. On September 28th, the ship fired 45 rounds at the German-held coast with an average of 2 minutes 38 seconds. A further 18 rounds came the next day, and no delays due to breakdown resulted.[3]

Lord Clive had her gun fitted and ran her trials on October 13th, but cessation of operations against the Belgian coast left her without battle experience. A third gun meant for Prince Eugene was delivered to Portsmouth, but its fitting within her was cancelled on October 22.[4]

Fire Control

ARTS1915Plate109.jpg

Directors

ARTS1915Plate108.jpg

All eight ships were fitted with directors in 1915.[5] General Wolfe, Lord Clive and Prince Eugene were later fitted with 18-in guns, requiring their directors to be updated in 1918, although this new director was never fitted in Prince Eugene.[6]

See Also

Footnotes

  1. The Technical History and Index, Vol. 4, Part 28. p. 36.
  2. The Technical History and Index, Vol. 4, Part 28. p. 35.
  3. The Technical History and Index, Vol. 4, Part 28. p. 35-6.
  4. The Technical History and Index, Vol. 4, Part 28. p. 36.
  5. The Technical History and Index, Vol. 3, Part 23. p. 13.
  6. The Technical History and Index, Vol. 3, Part 23. p. 14.

Bibliography

  • Admiralty, Gunnery Branch (1917). The Director Firing Handbook. O.U. 6125 (late C.B. 1259). Copy No. 322 at The National Archives. ADM 186/227.
  • Admiralty, Technical History Section (1919). The Technical History and Index: Fire Control in H.M. Ships. Vol. 3, Part 23. C.B. 1515 (23) now O.U. 6171/14. At The National Archives. ADM 275/19.
  • Buxton, Ian L. (1978). Big Gun Monitors: The History of the Design, Construction and Operation of the Royal Navy's Monitors. Tynemouth: World Ship Society. (on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk).


Lord Clive Class Monitor
  Earl of Peterborough General Craufurd General Wolfe Lord Clive  
  Prince Eugene Prince Rupert Sir John Moore Sir Thomas Picton  
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